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dc.contributorVall d'Hebron Barcelona Hospital Campus
dc.contributor.authorMontaña Ernst, Lena Nerea
dc.contributor.authorCasals, Eudald
dc.contributor.authorItaliani, Paola
dc.contributor.authorBoraschi, Diana
dc.contributor.authorFranco Puntes, Victor
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-21T09:04:02Z
dc.date.available2022-03-21T09:04:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-06
dc.identifier.citationErnst LM, Casals E, Italiani P, Boraschi D, Puntes V. The Interactions between Nanoparticles and the Innate Immune System from a Nanotechnologist Perspective. Nanomaterials. 2021 Nov 6;11(11):2991.
dc.identifier.issn2079-4991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11351/7215
dc.descriptionInflammation; Innate immunity; Nanoparticles
dc.description.abstractThe immune system contributes to maintaining the body’s functional integrity through its two main functions: recognizing and destroying foreign external agents (invading microorganisms) and identifying and eliminating senescent cells and damaged or abnormal endogenous entities (such as cellular debris or misfolded/degraded proteins). Accordingly, the immune system can detect molecular and cellular structures with a spatial resolution of a few nm, which allows for detecting molecular patterns expressed in a great variety of pathogens, including viral and bacterial proteins and bacterial nucleic acid sequences. Such patterns are also expressed in abnormal cells. In this context, it is expected that nanostructured materials in the size range of proteins, protein aggregates, and viruses with different molecular coatings can engage in a sophisticated interaction with the immune system. Nanoparticles can be recognized or passed undetected by the immune system. Once detected, they can be tolerated or induce defensive (inflammatory) or anti-inflammatory responses. This paper describes the different modes of interaction between nanoparticles, especially inorganic nanoparticles, and the immune system, especially the innate immune system. This perspective should help to propose a set of selection rules for nanosafety-by-design and medical nanoparticle design.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNanomaterials;11(11)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScientia
dc.subjectSistema immunològic
dc.subjectNanomedicina
dc.subject.meshNanomedicine
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Innate
dc.subject.meshImmune System
dc.titleThe Interactions between Nanoparticles and the Innate Immune System from a Nanotechnologist Perspective
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nano11112991
dc.subject.decsnanomedicina
dc.subject.decsinmunidad innata
dc.subject.decssistema inmunológico
dc.relation.publishversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/nano11112991
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.audienceProfessionals
dc.contributor.organismesInstitut Català de la Salut
dc.contributor.authoraffiliation[Ernst LM] Vall d’Hebron Institut de Recerca (VHIR), Barcelona, Spain. [Casals E] School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, Jiangmen, China. [Italiani P] Institute of Protein Biochemistry and Cell Biology (IBBC), National Research Council (CNR), Napoli, Italy. [Boraschi D] Institute of Protein Biochemistry and Cell Biology (IBBC), National Research Council (CNR), Napoli, Italy. Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology (SIAT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shenzhen, China. Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli, Italy. [Puntes V] Vall d’Hebron Institut de Recerca (VHIR), Barcelona, Spain. Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Campus UAB, Barcelona, Spain. Institució Catalana de Recerca I Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain
dc.identifier.pmid34835755
dc.identifier.wos000725696500001
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


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