Show simple item record

 
dc.contributorVall d'Hebron Barcelona Hospital Campus
dc.contributor.authorRavegnini, Gloria
dc.contributor.authorFosso, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorRicci, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorGorini, Francesca
dc.contributor.authorTurroni, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorSerrano Garcia, César
dc.contributor.authorPilco Janeta, Daniel Fernando
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-09T09:19:07Z
dc.date.available2022-09-09T09:19:07Z
dc.date.issued2022-08
dc.identifier.citationRavegnini G, Fosso B, Ricci R, Gorini F, Turroni S, Serrano C, et al. Analysis of microbiome in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Looking for different players in tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic options. Cancer Sci. 2022 Aug;113(8):2590–9.
dc.identifier.issn1349-7006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11351/8103
dc.descriptionCarcinogenesis; Microbiome; Tumor evolution
dc.description.abstractPreclinical forms of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), small asymptomatic lesions, called microGIST, are detected in approximately 30% of the general population. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor driver mutation can be already detected in microGISTs, even if they do not progress into malignant cancer; these mutations are necessary, but insufficient events to foster tumor progression. Here we profiled the tissue microbiota of 60 gastrointestinal specimens in three different patient cohorts—micro, low-risk, and high-risk or metastatic GIST—exploring the compositional structure, predicted function, and microbial networks, with the aim of providing a complete overview of microbial ecology in GIST and its preclinical form. Comparing microGISTs and GISTs, both weighted and unweighted UniFrac and Bray–Curtis dissimilarities showed significant community-level separation between them and a pronounced difference in Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidota was observed. Through the LEfSe tool, potential microbial biomarkers associated with a specific type of lesion were identified. In particular, GIST samples were significantly enriched in the phylum Proteobacteria compared to microGISTs. Several pathways involved in sugar metabolism were also highlighted in GISTs; this was expected as cancer usually displays high aerobic glycolysis in place of oxidative phosphorylation and rise of glucose flux to promote anabolic request. Our results highlight that specific differences do exist in the tissue microbiome community between GIST and benign lesions and that microbiome restructuration can drive the carcinogenesis process.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCancer Science;113(8)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.sourceScientia
dc.subjectIntestins - Microbiologia
dc.subjectAparell digestiu - Càncer
dc.subjectTub digestiu - Tumors
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMicrobiota
dc.titleAnalysis of microbiome in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Looking for different players in tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic options
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cas.15441
dc.subject.decstumores del estroma gastrointestinal
dc.subject.decsneoplasias gastrointestinales
dc.subject.decsmicrobiota
dc.relation.publishversionhttps://doi.org/10.1111/cas.15441
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.audienceProfessionals
dc.contributor.organismesInstitut Català de la Salut
dc.contributor.authoraffiliation[Ravegnini G, Gorini F, Turroni S] Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. [Fosso B] Institute of Biomembranes, Bioenergetics and Molecular Biotechnologies (IBIOM), National Research Council, Bari, Italy. Department of Biosciences, Biotechnology and Biopharmaceutics (DBBB), University of Bari “A. Moro”, Bari, Italy. [Ricci R] Department of Pathology, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. [Serrano C] Laboratori de Recerca Translacional de Sarcoma, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. [Pilco-Janeta DF] Laboratori de Recerca Translacional de Sarcoma, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
dc.identifier.pmid35633186
dc.identifier.wos000813989400001
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record