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dc.contributorVall d'Hebron Barcelona Hospital Campus
dc.contributor.authorMartinez Sánchez, Luisa Maria
dc.contributor.authorCobbaert, Christa
dc.contributor.authorNoordam, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorBrouwer, Nannette
dc.contributor.authorBlanco Grau, Albert
dc.contributor.authorVillena Ortiz, Yolanda
dc.contributor.authorThelen, Marc
dc.contributor.authorFerrer Costa, Roser
dc.contributor.authorCasis Saenz, Ernesto
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Frias, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorden Elzen, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-09T12:43:47Z
dc.date.available2022-09-09T12:43:47Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-19
dc.identifier.citationMartinez-Sanchez L, Cobbaert CM, Noordam R, Brouwer N, Blanco-Grau A, Villena-Ortiz Y, et al. Indirect determination of biochemistry reference intervals using outpatient data. PLoS One. 2022 May 19;17(5):e0268522.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11351/8117
dc.descriptionCreatinine; Urea; Clinical chemistry
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to determine reference intervals in an outpatient population from Vall d’Hebron laboratory using an indirect approach previously described in a Dutch population (NUMBER project). We used anonymized test results from individuals visiting general practitioners and analysed during 2018. Analytical quality was assured by EQA performance, daily average monitoring and by assessing longitudinal accuracy between 2018 and 2020 (using trueness verifiers from Dutch EQA). Per test, outliers by biochemically related tests were excluded, data were transformed to a normal distribution (if necessary) and means and standard deviations were calculated, stratified by age and sex. In addition, the reference limit estimator method was also used to calculate reference intervals using the same dataset. Finally, for standardized tests reference intervals obtained were compared with the published NUMBER results. Reference intervals were calculated using data from 509,408 clinical requests. For biochemical tests following a normal distribution, similar reference intervals were found between Vall d’Hebron and the Dutch study. For creatinine and urea, reference intervals increased with age in both populations. The upper limits of Gamma-glutamyl transferase were markedly higher in the Dutch study compared to Vall d’Hebron results. Creatine kinase and uric acid reference intervals were higher in both populations compared to conventional reference intervals. Medical test results following a normal distribution showed comparable and consistent reference intervals between studies. Therefore a simple indirect method is a feasible and cost-efficient approach for calculating reference intervals. Yet, for generating standardized calculated reference intervals that are traceable to higher order materials and methods, efforts should also focus on test standardization and bias assessment using commutable trueness verifiers.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPLoS One;17(5)
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScientia
dc.subjectPacients
dc.subjectLaboratoris clínics
dc.subjectValors de referència (Medicina)
dc.subject.meshOutpatients
dc.subject.meshReference Values
dc.subject.meshLaboratories
dc.titleIndirect determination of biochemistry reference intervals using outpatient data
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0268522
dc.subject.decspacientes ambulantes
dc.subject.decsvalores de referencia
dc.subject.decslaboratorios
dc.relation.publishversionhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0268522
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.audienceProfessionals
dc.contributor.organismesInstitut Català de la Salut
dc.contributor.authoraffiliation[Martinez-Sanchez L] Servei de Bioquímica, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. [Cobbaert CM] Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. [Noordam R] Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. [Brouwer N] Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, Amphia, Breda, The Netherlands. [Blanco-Grau A, Ferrer-Costa R, Casis E] Servei de Bioquímica, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. [Villena-Ortiz Y, Rodríguez-Frias F] Servei de Bioquímica, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. [Thelen M] Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Hematology, Amphia, Breda, The Netherlands. Stichting Kwaliteitsbewaking Medische Laboratoriumdiagnostiek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. [den Elzen WPJ] Servei de Bioquímica, Vall d’Hebron Hospital Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. Department of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. Atalmedial Diagnostics Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
dc.identifier.pmid35588100
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess


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